Nectarine (or Peach) Chutney - Sweet, Spicy & Pickled

Monday, August 24, 2015

Nectarine chutney with fruit from WA State Stone Fruit Association's Canbassador program using Kevin West's recipe in Saving the Seasons by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Late last month, we received a case of mighty tasty peaches and nectarines from the Washington State Stone Fruit Association as part of their "Canbassador" program. As a "Canbassador", I agree to can something and write about it and, in turn, they send me cases of fresh fruit to use - a mutually beneficial relationship which kicked off with a case of sweet cherries in June.

Peaches for chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

We ate quite a lot of them out of hand - in fact, our older son ate so many that I had to threaten to take away his dessert to get him to put the brakes on before he suffered any ill effects. Thus far, the power of dessert is unparalleled when it comes to "reasoning" with our children. Usually, it's the only thing that works...

I also made a delicious peach cobbler with biscuit topping and a delectable, gluten-free peach crisp (just substitute peaches for apples in this recipe) but a case contains rather a lot of fruit and it quickly became apparent that some canning was in order.

The Peaches by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Chutney was our go-to choice since we use quite a lot of it in the course of the year. The combination of sweet, spicy and pickled goes so well with curries, fritters, meats and more. We've made loquat chutney, apple rhubarb chutney, sweet cherry chutney and plum chutney - all delicious. But this was our first time using nectarines and the results were very fine.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

How can you really go wrong with perfect, sweet, ripe nectarines, fresh ginger, garlic, jalapenoes, bell pepper, onion and peppercorns plus plenty of vinegar and sugar to turn it into something that is both zingy and also shelf-stable. This recipe also calls for a few other spices and some Darjeeling tea which struck me as a novel way to add even more flavor.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I have to thank my college friend, Lexy who lives in New York and works in publishing for sending me a copy of Kevin West's beautifully written, wonderfully thorough book, Saving the Season: A Cook's Guide to Home Canning, Pickling, and Preserving from which this recipe hails.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

It's a cookbook that reads more like a memoir and is nicely rooted in place - in his case, Greenvalley, CA where he lived when he wrote it. It's joined the ranks of my favorite canning and preserving cookbooks, along with Food in Jars by Marisa McLellan and Put 'em Up!by Sherri Brooks Vinton.


If you've never canned anything before or just need a little refresher, check out my Canning 101 post before you dive in.

Nectarine chutney with fruit from WA State Stone Fruit Association's Canbassador program using Kevin West's recipe in Saving the Seasons by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

-- print recipe --Nectarine or Peach Chutney
From Kevin West's delightful book, Saving the Season
Makes 4 pints

Ingredients

* 5 pounds yellow peaches or nectarines, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
* 3 cups organic or turbinado sugar
* 2 cups apple-cider vinegar
* 3/4 cup raisins
* 1 cup chopped Vidalia onion
* 1 sweet banana pepper or 1/2 yellow bell pepper, diced
* 2 or 3 fresh green jalape簽os, diced, or adjust to taste
* 2 cloves garlic, minced
* 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger root
* 2 teaspoons freshly grated turmeric, or 1/2 teaspoon ground
* 4 tablespoons mustard seeds
* 1 teaspoon garam masala (a ground spice mixture containing pepper, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, nutmeg, cumin, and star anise)
* 2 teaspoons Darjeeling tea (or 4 tea bags)

Directions

1. Combine all the ingredients in a deep pot and bring to a boil, stirring a few times. Lower the heat to a simmer and reduce the mixture for up to an hour, until all the excess liquid has boiled away and what remains is thick and jammy. Taste it and adjust the seasonings to your liking. I am wimpy about spice so I tend to err on the mild side of things but you may like it hot in which case, you may want to add more chilis.

2. Ladle the hot chutney into four prepared pint jars, leaving 1/4" headspace. Wipe the rims with a damp, clean cloth, top with the jar lids, add the rings and turn until tight but do not overtighten then process in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes. For best flavor, let the chutney cure for a month before you eat it.

You might also like:


For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.

The Pain and the Pleasure of Parenting

Thursday, August 20, 2015

What is it about raising children that plays fast and loose both with my emotions and also with my perception of time?

One moment I will look at my boys' sweet, rounded, joyful, food-smeared little faces - both so dear that it hurts - and wish I could freeze time to keep them just like this forever.

Meanwhile the days hurtle past with no concern for my tender maternal feelings whatsoever.

My older son will start first grade in a few weeks. First fucking grade! I could swear that he was just an infant - a fussy infant, but still, an innocent, utterly dependent, tiny baby in my arms with that wonderful smell that makes you sniff their heads like some kind of addict. And yet he learned to ride his bike without training wheels last week. Time marches on.

Will with our Japanese eggplants by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

My little guy will start nursery school in a few weeks. He's well on the way to being potty trained even though he still prefers to have us put a diaper on him so he can go stand behind his play kitchen with his face practically pressed against the wall - it looks terribly uncomfortable - when it's time to poop.

He recently mastered going up and down the stairs on his own even though we still insist that someone accompany him. The baby gates will be coming down soon - I can feel it - truly the end of an era.

He delights in talking on the phone (both real and imaginary) and tells a story with panache, complete with dramatic pauses and coy facial expressions. Every time he whispers conspiratorially, "Can I tell you about slugs?" in what has become a very successful bedtime-stalling tactic, I wish I had my phone to take a video of his darling nearly three-year-old-ness. But of course, I never do, so I just listen while he tells me about slugs and try to steal a few kisses.

This photo was taken by our talented friend, Jennifer May - it's a few months old and we both have shorter hair now.
And yet, for every sweet moment that I wish would never end, there are just as many moments when it feels like time is moving slower than the ripples that would form in the tar on my country road on the very hottest days of summer in my own childhood.

Their bickering and hitting and screaming will reach a fever pitch and I feel like I CAN'T STAND THIS A MOMENT LONGER! I often yell and sometimes say things I regret and end up feeling rather like a child, myself.

But don't they know how lucky they are to have a brother? That this person is their blood -- the only other person who will ever understand the wonderful craziness that is their family? That the person they're trying to kick and make it look like an accident or who they just punched in the face will be there for them to lean on when mom or dad needs to be taken care of someday or (gulp) dies? That they are lucky they won't have to face life's knocks or celebrate its gifts alone? But at six and not-quite-three, these truths have not yet become clear to them, of course.

We've had a string of unbearably hot, humid, childcare-less days in the weeks since their camps ended. The kind of days when I have actual paying work I need to do plus lots of laundry and cooking and mundane crap like filling out the mountain of forms before school starts and they're both hot and bored and cranky and express it by baiting each other and making endless demands so that every time their father or I finally sits down at the computer for a moment, they issue another imperious command from the couch and I wish to God that I had the power to fast forward until they're asleep in their beds upstairs and I can tiptoe in to peek at their cherubic, slumbering, little bodies - cheeks flushed and arms thrown over their heads in sleepy abandon - and press a surreptitious kiss on a cheek or a hand before falling into an exhausted, boneless sleep in my own bed next door.

So much for living in the moment...

I hope the first day of school goes well for everyone. I cannot wait for it but will also probably cry when it does roll around.

You might also like:

Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Pomegranate-roasted eggplant with toasted pecans, chives and feta cheese by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Although I have become much more adventurous in my cooking over the years, I am not exactly what I would call a powerhouse of invention. I mostly try things that look good to me and tweak them to my liking. Which is fine. But every once in a while, I come up with something all my own and I get all puffed up with pride. My Creation...

This is just such a one and it is really delicious. It was inspired by the long, thin, dark purple, little beauties our three Japanese eggplant plants are churning out of late. Gorgeous and tasty and so very fresh. I love walking outside my door to gather food that I then translate into a meal with no time for the vegetables herbs and fruits to languish in between. It is the ultimate luxury for someone who likes food...

by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I have loved pomegranate molasses every since my first taste. It is at once sweet and tart with a rich, fruity flavor. It's quite good eaten by the spoonful,but also does tremendous things for a lot of different foods (click for some inspiring ways to use this fantastic stuff.) And roasted eggplant is most definitely one of them.

Pomegranate molasses by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I cut up the eggplants into little finger-length wedges of roughly equivalent size so that they would roast evenly. Then I put them in a colander, salted them liberally and left them to drain for a while (longer is better but don't be put off by that if you're in a rush, it will still taste good.)

Salting the sliced eggplant in a collander by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Then I gave them a little rinse and tossed them right on the baking sheet with a lot of olive oil, a healthy drizzle of pomegranate molasses, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and some garlic powder. The purists among you are more than welcome to mince or press some fresh garlic if garlic powder is distasteful to you, of course, but I love the ease and the way it kind of just disappears into the mix of flavors.

Eggplant tossed with olive oil, pomegranate molasses, salt, pepper and garlic powder about to go in to the oven to roast by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Then into the oven, which I had preheated to 400 degrees, to roast for a good 45 minutes or so, turning regularly to avoid anything burning or cooking unevenly. The end result is a wonderfully caramelized mess of nutty, sweet, tart eggplant. It is quite decadent just like this if you prefer to stop here.

Pomegranate roasted Japanese eggplant by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I toasted some pecans, chopped them up and tossed them on top along with some fresh chives from the garden and some chunks of salty feta cheese. It went fast! Try it and see what you think. Feel free to omit the cheese if you're a vegan - it really is delicious without it - I think I even like it better with just the nuts and no cheese.

Pomegranate roasted Japanese eggplant by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Oh, and if you're curious about some of my other original culinary inventions, check out my perfect potato green bean salad with lemon dill aioli, my simple and wonderful red cabbage, honey, lime and cilantro slaw and my delicious sweet and sour maple-soy roasted cabbage. When I am good, I am very good...

-- print recipe --
Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives
Serves 4

Ingredients

* Roughly 3 pounds of eggplant - 3 medium or 8-10 small, Japanese eggplants
* 3-4 Tbsps olive oil
* 2-3 Tbsps pomegranate molasses
* 2 Tbsps sea salt
* 2 tsps freshly ground black pepper
* 2 tsps garlic powder
* 3/4 cup pecans, toasted and coarsely chopped
* A handful of fresh chives, washed and chopped
* Half a cup of drained, crumbled feta cheese (optional, omit for a vegan dish)

Directions

1. Slice the eggplant into wedges or chunks of roughly the same size and shape to ensure even cooking. Sprinkle liberally with salt and set in a colander or sieve in the sink to drain, turning a few times to ensure that the salt coats the eggplant slices evenly. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

2. Let the eggplant sit for 30 minutes then give a quick rinse to remove some of the salt. Toss the eggplant slices with the olive oil, molasses, pepper and garlic powder, turning until everything is well-coated with the mixture, then put it in the oven to roast, turning every 15-20 minutes to avoid burning or sticking. Cook until you are satisfied with the results which should be soft and caramelized - the exact cooking time will vary depending on how large or small you've cut your eggplant but I'd guess that it will take at least 35-40 minutes. This gives you plenty of time to toast and chop the pecans and chop up the chives.

3. Remove the eggplant from the trays with a metal spatula and place in the serving bowl or platter of your choice. Top with the pecans, chives and feta cheese, if you choose to use it. Drizzle with a little olive oil and serve.

You might also like:
For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Nectarine (or Peach) Chutney - Sweet, Spicy & Pickled

Nectarine chutney with fruit from WA State Stone Fruit Association's Canbassador program using Kevin West's recipe in Saving the Seasons by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Late last month, we received a case of mighty tasty peaches and nectarines from the Washington State Stone Fruit Association as part of their "Canbassador" program. As a "Canbassador", I agree to can something and write about it and, in turn, they send me cases of fresh fruit to use - a mutually beneficial relationship which kicked off with a case of sweet cherries in June.

Peaches for chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

We ate quite a lot of them out of hand - in fact, our older son ate so many that I had to threaten to take away his dessert to get him to put the brakes on before he suffered any ill effects. Thus far, the power of dessert is unparalleled when it comes to "reasoning" with our children. Usually, it's the only thing that works...

I also made a delicious peach cobbler with biscuit topping and a delectable, gluten-free peach crisp (just substitute peaches for apples in this recipe) but a case contains rather a lot of fruit and it quickly became apparent that some canning was in order.

The Peaches by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Chutney was our go-to choice since we use quite a lot of it in the course of the year. The combination of sweet, spicy and pickled goes so well with curries, fritters, meats and more. We've made loquat chutney, apple rhubarb chutney, sweet cherry chutney and plum chutney - all delicious. But this was our first time using nectarines and the results were very fine.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

How can you really go wrong with perfect, sweet, ripe nectarines, fresh ginger, garlic, jalapenoes, bell pepper, onion and peppercorns plus plenty of vinegar and sugar to turn it into something that is both zingy and also shelf-stable. This recipe also calls for a few other spices and some Darjeeling tea which struck me as a novel way to add even more flavor.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I have to thank my college friend, Lexy who lives in New York and works in publishing for sending me a copy of Kevin West's beautifully written, wonderfully thorough book, Saving the Season: A Cook's Guide to Home Canning, Pickling, and Preserving from which this recipe hails.

Nectarine chutney by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

It's a cookbook that reads more like a memoir and is nicely rooted in place - in his case, Greenvalley, CA where he lived when he wrote it. It's joined the ranks of my favorite canning and preserving cookbooks, along with Food in Jars by Marisa McLellan and Put 'em Up!by Sherri Brooks Vinton.


If you've never canned anything before or just need a little refresher, check out my Canning 101 post before you dive in.

Nectarine chutney with fruit from WA State Stone Fruit Association's Canbassador program using Kevin West's recipe in Saving the Seasons by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

-- print recipe --Nectarine or Peach Chutney
From Kevin West's delightful book, Saving the Season
Makes 4 pints

Ingredients

* 5 pounds yellow peaches or nectarines, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
* 3 cups organic or turbinado sugar
* 2 cups apple-cider vinegar
* 3/4 cup raisins
* 1 cup chopped Vidalia onion
* 1 sweet banana pepper or 1/2 yellow bell pepper, diced
* 2 or 3 fresh green jalape簽os, diced, or adjust to taste
* 2 cloves garlic, minced
* 2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger root
* 2 teaspoons freshly grated turmeric, or 1/2 teaspoon ground
* 4 tablespoons mustard seeds
* 1 teaspoon garam masala (a ground spice mixture containing pepper, cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, nutmeg, cumin, and star anise)
* 2 teaspoons Darjeeling tea (or 4 tea bags)

Directions

1. Combine all the ingredients in a deep pot and bring to a boil, stirring a few times. Lower the heat to a simmer and reduce the mixture for up to an hour, until all the excess liquid has boiled away and what remains is thick and jammy. Taste it and adjust the seasonings to your liking. I am wimpy about spice so I tend to err on the mild side of things but you may like it hot in which case, you may want to add more chilis.

2. Ladle the hot chutney into four prepared pint jars, leaving 1/4" headspace. Wipe the rims with a damp, clean cloth, top with the jar lids, add the rings and turn until tight but do not overtighten then process in a boiling-water bath for 10 minutes. For best flavor, let the chutney cure for a month before you eat it.

You might also like:


For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

The Pain and the Pleasure of Parenting

What is it about raising children that plays fast and loose both with my emotions and also with my perception of time?

One moment I will look at my boys' sweet, rounded, joyful, food-smeared little faces - both so dear that it hurts - and wish I could freeze time to keep them just like this forever.

Meanwhile the days hurtle past with no concern for my tender maternal feelings whatsoever.

My older son will start first grade in a few weeks. First fucking grade! I could swear that he was just an infant - a fussy infant, but still, an innocent, utterly dependent, tiny baby in my arms with that wonderful smell that makes you sniff their heads like some kind of addict. And yet he learned to ride his bike without training wheels last week. Time marches on.

Will with our Japanese eggplants by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

My little guy will start nursery school in a few weeks. He's well on the way to being potty trained even though he still prefers to have us put a diaper on him so he can go stand behind his play kitchen with his face practically pressed against the wall - it looks terribly uncomfortable - when it's time to poop.

He recently mastered going up and down the stairs on his own even though we still insist that someone accompany him. The baby gates will be coming down soon - I can feel it - truly the end of an era.

He delights in talking on the phone (both real and imaginary) and tells a story with panache, complete with dramatic pauses and coy facial expressions. Every time he whispers conspiratorially, "Can I tell you about slugs?" in what has become a very successful bedtime-stalling tactic, I wish I had my phone to take a video of his darling nearly three-year-old-ness. But of course, I never do, so I just listen while he tells me about slugs and try to steal a few kisses.

This photo was taken by our talented friend, Jennifer May - it's a few months old and we both have shorter hair now.
And yet, for every sweet moment that I wish would never end, there are just as many moments when it feels like time is moving slower than the ripples that would form in the tar on my country road on the very hottest days of summer in my own childhood.

Their bickering and hitting and screaming will reach a fever pitch and I feel like I CAN'T STAND THIS A MOMENT LONGER! I often yell and sometimes say things I regret and end up feeling rather like a child, myself.

But don't they know how lucky they are to have a brother? That this person is their blood -- the only other person who will ever understand the wonderful craziness that is their family? That the person they're trying to kick and make it look like an accident or who they just punched in the face will be there for them to lean on when mom or dad needs to be taken care of someday or (gulp) dies? That they are lucky they won't have to face life's knocks or celebrate its gifts alone? But at six and not-quite-three, these truths have not yet become clear to them, of course.

We've had a string of unbearably hot, humid, childcare-less days in the weeks since their camps ended. The kind of days when I have actual paying work I need to do plus lots of laundry and cooking and mundane crap like filling out the mountain of forms before school starts and they're both hot and bored and cranky and express it by baiting each other and making endless demands so that every time their father or I finally sits down at the computer for a moment, they issue another imperious command from the couch and I wish to God that I had the power to fast forward until they're asleep in their beds upstairs and I can tiptoe in to peek at their cherubic, slumbering, little bodies - cheeks flushed and arms thrown over their heads in sleepy abandon - and press a surreptitious kiss on a cheek or a hand before falling into an exhausted, boneless sleep in my own bed next door.

So much for living in the moment...

I hope the first day of school goes well for everyone. I cannot wait for it but will also probably cry when it does roll around.

You might also like:

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives

Pomegranate-roasted eggplant with toasted pecans, chives and feta cheese by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Although I have become much more adventurous in my cooking over the years, I am not exactly what I would call a powerhouse of invention. I mostly try things that look good to me and tweak them to my liking. Which is fine. But every once in a while, I come up with something all my own and I get all puffed up with pride. My Creation...

This is just such a one and it is really delicious. It was inspired by the long, thin, dark purple, little beauties our three Japanese eggplant plants are churning out of late. Gorgeous and tasty and so very fresh. I love walking outside my door to gather food that I then translate into a meal with no time for the vegetables herbs and fruits to languish in between. It is the ultimate luxury for someone who likes food...

by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I have loved pomegranate molasses every since my first taste. It is at once sweet and tart with a rich, fruity flavor. It's quite good eaten by the spoonful,but also does tremendous things for a lot of different foods (click for some inspiring ways to use this fantastic stuff.) And roasted eggplant is most definitely one of them.

Pomegranate molasses by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I cut up the eggplants into little finger-length wedges of roughly equivalent size so that they would roast evenly. Then I put them in a colander, salted them liberally and left them to drain for a while (longer is better but don't be put off by that if you're in a rush, it will still taste good.)

Salting the sliced eggplant in a collander by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Then I gave them a little rinse and tossed them right on the baking sheet with a lot of olive oil, a healthy drizzle of pomegranate molasses, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper and some garlic powder. The purists among you are more than welcome to mince or press some fresh garlic if garlic powder is distasteful to you, of course, but I love the ease and the way it kind of just disappears into the mix of flavors.

Eggplant tossed with olive oil, pomegranate molasses, salt, pepper and garlic powder about to go in to the oven to roast by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Then into the oven, which I had preheated to 400 degrees, to roast for a good 45 minutes or so, turning regularly to avoid anything burning or cooking unevenly. The end result is a wonderfully caramelized mess of nutty, sweet, tart eggplant. It is quite decadent just like this if you prefer to stop here.

Pomegranate roasted Japanese eggplant by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

I toasted some pecans, chopped them up and tossed them on top along with some fresh chives from the garden and some chunks of salty feta cheese. It went fast! Try it and see what you think. Feel free to omit the cheese if you're a vegan - it really is delicious without it - I think I even like it better with just the nuts and no cheese.

Pomegranate roasted Japanese eggplant by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Oh, and if you're curious about some of my other original culinary inventions, check out my perfect potato green bean salad with lemon dill aioli, my simple and wonderful red cabbage, honey, lime and cilantro slaw and my delicious sweet and sour maple-soy roasted cabbage. When I am good, I am very good...

-- print recipe --
Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives
Serves 4

Ingredients

* Roughly 3 pounds of eggplant - 3 medium or 8-10 small, Japanese eggplants
* 3-4 Tbsps olive oil
* 2-3 Tbsps pomegranate molasses
* 2 Tbsps sea salt
* 2 tsps freshly ground black pepper
* 2 tsps garlic powder
* 3/4 cup pecans, toasted and coarsely chopped
* A handful of fresh chives, washed and chopped
* Half a cup of drained, crumbled feta cheese (optional, omit for a vegan dish)

Directions

1. Slice the eggplant into wedges or chunks of roughly the same size and shape to ensure even cooking. Sprinkle liberally with salt and set in a colander or sieve in the sink to drain, turning a few times to ensure that the salt coats the eggplant slices evenly. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

2. Let the eggplant sit for 30 minutes then give a quick rinse to remove some of the salt. Toss the eggplant slices with the olive oil, molasses, pepper and garlic powder, turning until everything is well-coated with the mixture, then put it in the oven to roast, turning every 15-20 minutes to avoid burning or sticking. Cook until you are satisfied with the results which should be soft and caramelized - the exact cooking time will vary depending on how large or small you've cut your eggplant but I'd guess that it will take at least 35-40 minutes. This gives you plenty of time to toast and chop the pecans and chop up the chives.

3. Remove the eggplant from the trays with a metal spatula and place in the serving bowl or platter of your choice. Top with the pecans, chives and feta cheese, if you choose to use it. Drizzle with a little olive oil and serve.

You might also like:
For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.